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By: Kevin Asp on January 4th, 2016

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AAST Member of the Month: Kiara Jablonski

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Meet Kiara Jablonski, the AAST member of the month!

Every month, the AAST will highlight the accomplishments of one of our talented members. Want to nominate someone or yourself as the AAST's member of the month? Fill out our form at the end of this article!

Kiara Jablonski, a sleep technologist from Bordentown, NJ, was recently featured in our article on our webinar offering "Managing Your Sleep Technologist Career." Not only is she an accomplished sleep technologist at Capital Health Center for Sleep Medicine in Trenton, NJ, but she is also a recipient of the The German Nino-Murcia, MD Achievement Award . In 2013 she received the award as an AAST member who  recently passed the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists credentialing examination and who best exemplifies excellence in the performance of a polysomnogram and in patient care.

Q: When did you start your career in sleep medicine, and why did you decide to become a sleep technologist?

Kiara Jablonski: I started my career in sleep medicine in 2009. I stumbled upon sleep technology when my mom brought home a flyer for an open house for a training course through Capital Health. Once I researched and learned more about sleep I realized how interesting it is and how sleep has an impact on every single person. I have always loved the medical field and helping people and to find a career that you never stop learning in has made me love this field. Seeing patients have such a drastic improvement on their quality of life because they are sleeping better will never get old. It makes my job very rewarding day after day. 

When did you become an AAST member and why?

Kiara Jablonski: I'm not exactly sure when I became an AAST member but it does have many benefits as a sleep technologist. Working in a sleep center with several technologists who have been in the field many years I learned the importance of being a member. 

How does being a part of a professional organization like AAST help you as a sleep technologist?

Kiara Jablonski: Being relatively new in this field the AAST provides the chance to network with other professionals across the country. Also, as sleep medicine continues to change the AAST keeps technologists like myself up to date with tools to educate us.

What's the best advice someone gave you related to your profession?

Kiara Jablonski: The best advice, from another technologist who was teaching me, was to never stop learning about sleep. I took that advice and ran with it. In just six years I have learned many different aspects of sleep and passed two different boards related to sleep. 

Are there any resources you would like to see more of from the AAST?

Kiara Jablonski: I don't know of anything I would need that isn't there already. 

Where do you think sleep technology is headed and how do you envision your career changing over time?

Kiara Jablonski: I believe sleep technology is going to shift from the routine sleep studies at night to more challenging complex sleep apnea titrations. I also think there will be a larger need for technologists during the day, shifting our job duties to helping patients become more compliant with their PAP devices and troubleshooting their complaints.
 
And remember fill out the form below to nominate someone or yourself as the AAST's sleep technologist of the month!
 
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