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Sleep Technology

AAST Blog

The latest on all issues affecting sleep technologists, including trends, insights, tips and more.

Richard Rosenberg, PhD

Blog Feature

sleep apnea

Oh, Epworth, We Hardly Knew Ye

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
June 21st, 2018

Murray Johns developed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and published his methodology in 1991. (1) He subsequently tested its reliability in a group of 104 medical students (2) and found a test-retest correlation of r = .82. For those of us who are fans of Karl Pearson and his product-moment correlation coefficient (and I know there are many fans out there), this is a very large correlation and indicates that the measure is reliable.

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Can’t Make it to a Live Course this Summer?

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
June 7th, 2018

My travel budget is limited, and I’m sure yours is as well. When I can’t make it to a meeting, I can always get the meeting to come to me through AAST’s Learning Center. I can watch and learn in the comfort of my own home. I can pause to take the dog for a walk, grab a snack from the fridge or whatever. Here are a few of my favorites from recent courses:

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Sleep Disorders

Casting a Wider Net for the Diagnosis of RBD

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
May 29th, 2018

Every healthcare professional walks into the examination room with predetermined biases regarding the patients they see. Fifty-year-old obese man? OSA, of course. Twenty-year-old woman with daytime sleepiness? Could be narcolepsy. A man comes to the sleep center with his wife and she has a black eye? REM behavior disorder (RBD) is suddenly on your radar.

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AAST Joins the Effort to Combat Clinician Burnout

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
April 25th, 2018

The AAST recently joined the Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience of the National Academy of Medicine. The program has three goals: Improve the understanding of challenges to clinician well-being Raise the visibility of clinician stress and burnout Elevate solutions that will improve patient care by caring for the caregiver

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For? Against? Or Too Soon to Comment? The AASM Position Statement on Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
April 20th, 2018

The AASM recently released a position statement on the use of medical cannabis for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. (1) It states: “It is the position of the AASM: That medical cannabis and/or its synthetic extracts should not be used for the treatment of OSA due to unreliable delivery methods and insufficient evidence of treatment effectiveness, tolerability, and safety, and OSA should be excluded from the list of chronic medical conditions for state medical cannabis programs.” (p. 680)

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Capnography – Not Just for Children

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
April 13th, 2018

At AAST’s 39th Annual Meeting, Julie DeWitte provided an excellent lecture on capnography. She reviewed how the two main methods work (end-tidal and transcutaneous technologies), when they should be used and what it means when there are discrepancies between the two methods. She presented several illustrative cases for discussion. Unfortunately, due to a severe case of laryngitis, she didn’t really present the talk. Joel Porquez did an admirable job of filling in for Julie, but we didn’t have the opportunity to hear it directly from her. Now, thanks to the magic of a recording studio and some video editing, the lecture is available at the AAST website.

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Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine

Sleep in Patients with ALS

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
February 15th, 2018

I try to start my blogs in a lighthearted way, but there is nothing lighthearted about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as ALS. ALS is a group of progressive diseases of upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in weakness of muscles. The course is often rapid, with most people dying from respiratory failure within three to five years from the onset of symptoms. Patients have difficulty breathing due to weakness of respiratory muscles. As the disease progresses, patients may require tracheostomy and ventilation. There is no known treatment.

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Sleep Health – It’s Not Just About Treating Sleep Disorders

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
January 17th, 2018

Key opinion leaders who worked with me to develop the Predictions for Sleep Technology Profession in 2018 e-book emphasized the role that wearable monitors might play in the future of sleep medicine. In addition, I recently wrote a blog on a preliminary study using wrist monitors to diagnose OSA. This got me thinking about the potential value of the information collected by these devices beyond sleep disorders. A pair of articles in the most recent Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the focus of the January Journal Club. Surprisingly, neither of these articles focused on sleep disorders – instead, the focus was on sleep health.

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Thinking About Teaching and Teaching About Thinking

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
January 12th, 2018

For the past five years I have been teaching in the Psychology Department at California State University, Long Beach (Go Beach! Of course, when you think about it, the beach can’t really go anywhere. And what school has a beach as a mascot? But I digress.). My students are very diverse and many are the first in their families to attend college. Communication skills and scientific knowledge are often lacking. But when I speak to my students during office hours I find that they are intelligent, enthusiastic and motivated to learn. They make me want to learn how to be a better teacher.

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Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with a Cannabimimetic – Dude, Seriously?

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
December 11th, 2017

Don’t let the fancy name of the medication fool you. The cannabimimetic is dronabinol, a synthetic non-selective CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist. But really, it’s marijuana. As medical and recreational use of marijuana becomes legal state by state, research that has been impossible has now become available. And the therapeutic effects of marijuana are extending beyond the well-known positive effects for chemotherapy patients. High on that list of benefits is, believe it or not, obstructive sleep apnea.

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