<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1717549828521399&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Sleep Technology

AAST Blog

The latest on all issues affecting sleep technologists, including trends, insights, tips and more.

Blog Feature

aast

Compliance Corner

By: Laura Linley, CRT, RPSGT, FAAST
February 22nd, 2019

On Aug. 8, 2018, Carecentrix released its criteria for determining the medical necessity for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disordered breathing in adults and children. I wanted to take this opportunity to review their guideline for home sleep apnea testing (HSAT).

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

aast

Book Review: ‘The Mystery of Sleep’

By: Tamara Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH
February 14th, 2019

I was one of the lucky “birthday” winners to receive a free copy of Meir Kryger’s latest book, “The Mystery of Sleep,” at the AAST meeting in Indianapolis last fall. TMoS is touted as “an authoritative and accessible guide to what happens when we shut our eyes at night.” Indeed, I found the format, tone and relevance of Kryger’s book to live up to the hype.

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

aast

In the Moonlight: Q&A With Michael G. Eden, RPSGT, RST

By: AAST Editor
February 7th, 2019

Michael G. Eden, RPSGT, RST, has been working in sleep medicine for 23 years and became an RPSGT in 1998. Eden has worked for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario as a task force member, creating legislation for all sleep clinics in Ontario. He has been on the executive board of the Canadian Sleep Society and chairs the Education Committee. Eden has been on the Scientific and Technologist Planning Committee for both the Canadian Sleep Society and the World Sleep Society, planning international meetings. He has been on the CEC Committee for AAST for the past two years. Recently, he was elected to the AAST Board of Directors. It is his pleasure to serve the sleep community in any capacity, but education and patient advocacy are key elements to his work.

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

aast | aasm

Do It! Do It!

By: Richard Rosenberg, PhD
January 30th, 2019

On a snowy day in 1975, Allan Rechtschaffen came into the conference room at the University of Chicago Sleep Research Laboratory and told me I should join a group called the Association for the Psychophysiological Study of Sleep. He said there was an annual meeting and some other stuff that would make it worth my while. The other graduate students started to chant, “Do it! Do it!” and so, succumbing to peer pressure, I joined my first professional society. (Author’s note: I’m not sure it really happened that way. It was a long time ago. My memory for what I just had for breakfast is hazy, so you can imagine what is left of my 1975 memories. But something like that did happen. I think.) I’ve been a member ever since.

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

aast

Sleep Spindles: The Ongoing Need for Education

By: AAST Editor
November 8th, 2018

Sleep spindles are an information processing and transferring feature of the sleeping brain. With that in mind, AAST gathered together leading sleep-care professionals to discuss hot topics in the field — transferring information from them to you. AAST board member Allen Boone, RPSGT, RST, CCRA, CCRC, hosts this four-part video series. In our fourth and final installment, we have an interview with fellow board member Brendan Duffy, RPSGT, RST, CCSH, and Past President Laura A. Linley, RST, RPSGT, CRTT, on the topic of the need for ongoing education.  

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

Sleep Technology Trends | sleep technologist | aast

The Changing Face of Sleep Technology, Part III

By: Kent Caylor, RPSGT
November 1st, 2018

This article is part three in a four-part series on the ever-changing face of sleep technology. In this article, we’ll address the following questions: What does the future of sleep medicine look like? How will evolving technology change the way sleep studies are done? And, just as importantly, how will economic pressures affect sleep medicine?

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

sleep technologist | aast

4 Perspectives on Sleep Tech Education

By: Alexa Schlosser
October 18th, 2018

Sleep technologists have an important and wide-ranging job. They care for patients with sleep disorders, which can encompass comprehensive evaluation and treatment of sleep disorders, including in-center polysomnographic testing and out-of-center sleep testing; diagnostic and therapeutic interventions; comprehensive patient care; and direct patient education.

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

Sleep Medicine | CPAP | sleep technologist | aast | sleep apnea

Monthly Musings - How Are Your DMEs?

By: AAST Editor
October 12th, 2018

Every sleep professional knows that getting the right equipment (and getting it to work right) is crucial for any patient. Sometimes the companies that make durable medical equipment (or DMEs) are extremely helpful when working with patients, while others are not. We asked some of our members to explain their relationship working with DMEs, for better or for worse.

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

Sleep Technology Trends | aast

Sleep Spindles: Talking Tech With Patients

By: AAST Editor
October 4th, 2018

Sleep spindles are an information processing and transferring feature of the sleeping brain. With that in mind, AAST gathered together leading sleep-care professionals to discuss hot topics in the field — transferring information from them to you. AAST board member Allen Boone, RPSGT, RST, CCRA, CCRC, hosts this four-part video series. In our third installment, we have an interview with fellow board members Laree J. Fordyce, RST, RPSGT, CCSH, and Brendan Duffy, RPSGT, RST, CCSH, on the topic of talking tech with patients.    

Read More

Share

Blog Feature

Events | aast

How to Make the Most of AAST’s 2018 Annual Meeting

By: Tamara Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH
September 27th, 2018

The AAST 2018 Annual Meeting is quickly approaching. Whether it’s your first conference or you’re a veteran, everyone could use help maximizing their time. Savvy conference-goers know this: While sessions are valuable, the conversations between them are invaluable. Face-to-face networking with your peers is the No. 1 reason why you should attend any conference.

Read More

Share