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Blog Feature

By: Tamara Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH on February 16th, 2021

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This Week in Sleep Medicine: February 16, 2021

Sleep Technologist Advice

While You Were Sleeping: What Sleep Technologists Need to Know This Week

Happy Mardi Gras

Your media watchdog for headlines and trends
relevant to sleep technology and patient education.

 


PANDEMIC QUICK LINKS

For the latest information, please check the following resources:

U.S. FOOD & DRUG ADMINISTRATION 
   Updated: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: February 12, 2021

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SLEEP TECHNOLOGISTS 
   Updated: Sleep-Related COVID-19 Resources
   COVID-19 Sleep Lab Guideline: December 2020

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF SLEEP MEDICINE 
   VIDEO | COVID-19 and Sleep Medicine Update | AASM town hall forum
   Update from the AASM COVID-19 Task Force | January 2021
   
COVID-19 Resources
   New webcasts explore teleVID-19 practice expenses
   AMA finalizes new CPT code for COVID-19 expenses
   VIDEO | Presidential Town Hall Forum – COVID-19 and Sleep Medicine
   Considerations for the practice of sleep medicine during COVID-19
   COVID-19: FAQs for Sleep Clinicians
   Summary of CDC recommendations relevant for sleep practices during COVID-19

OTHER RESOURCES
   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
   World Health Organization Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak


ADVOCACY WATCH

A sleep hygiene intervention to improve sleep quality for hospitalized patients
THE JOINT COMMISSION JOURNAL ON QUALITY AND PATIENT SAFETY
February 10, 2021

From the research study abstract: “Choosing Wisely, a high value care list published by the American Board of Internal Medicine, emphasizes the importance of sleep hygiene in hospitalized patients by recommending against unnecessary interruptions of patients’ sleep in the hospital. This recommendation is ranked as a high priority with patient advocates.”

Takeaway: I wonder how sleep technologists with the CCSH credential might be able to work with their hospital affiliates to blaze a trail for better sleep among their general inpatient populations. If you have such ambitions, this article might be your springboard.

CULTURE WATCH

What medicine can learn from a poem
KEVIN MD
February 11, 2021

From the blog: “Medicine has recently become more aware of this power. Narrative medicine specifically has offered to us the untapped resource of the vital role that words have on health. As a result, the field has left the medical world’s fringes and found its way more engrained in its core practice. The importance of medical humanities is because the field not only represents human experience but is intrinsically a human experience. Additionally, through the expression of creative works, bridges of empathy are formed and solidified between medical practitioners and patients. These connections further exist even among practitioners themselves, creating a commonality and unified sense of kinship.”

Takeaway: A good reminder that we are treating whole people, many who may be easier to reach through creative expression versus clinical information. As a poet myself, I can confirm that this isn't a fluke: there's more creative writing circulating under the aegis of "illness and wellness writing" than ever before.  

TREND WATCH

Here's where 2 ENTs expect the most growth potential
SLEEP REVIEW
February 10, 2021

From the article: Becker’s ASC Review: During the pandemic we have seen increases in alcohol consumption, weight gain and reports of post-COVID-19 sleep difficulty — all of which point to the need for an increased focus on sleep medicine.

Takeaway: If there is a bright side to the pandemic, it might be job security as sleep specialists are called to tackle these emergent side effects of life in lockdown.

INDUSTRY WATCH

New Meta-Analysis Makes ‘Compelling Case for Sleep Assessments to Be Included in Epilepsy Management’
SLEEP REVIEW
February 10, 2021

From the article: “'Children with epilepsy sleep poorly compared to healthy children and are more likely to experience disruptions such as night terrors, sleepwalking, or sleep-disordered breathing, according to a new study.

Takeaway: If young patients with epilepsy could be given sleep testing early into their diagnosis, that could be extremely useful. Addressing their sleep problems and improving their sleep hygiene could significantly reduce the impact of poor sleep on their long-term health, as poor sleep can seriously aggravate epilepsy. And yet, sleep in these patients is not routinely evaluated by their doctors.

TECHNOLOGY WATCH

In-Lab Polysomnography (PSG) Comparison Guide
SLEEP REVIEW
February 11, 2021

From the comparison guide: “Compare PSG equipment on parameters such as reporting, lab management software details, amplifier specifications, video options, and more.

Takeaway: These annual guides are some of the best resources for sleep clinics  making purchasing and upgrade decisions. Thank you, Sleep Review!

PHARMA WATCH

Experts Explain Why You Might Experience an Uptick in Nightmares While Taking Melatonin
POPSUGAR
February 9, 2021

From the article: “If you've ever had trouble falling asleep at night, chances are someone has recommended that you try melatonin. This over-the-counter supplement can help regulate your sleep-wake cycle when taken about an hour before bed. But while melatonin is popular, it could also have some unintended side effects—and experts generally agree that it isn't a long-term solution to your sleep problems. …One of the more surprising side effects of taking melatonin? Nightmares. Here's why they happen—and what you can do to get a more peaceful night's sleep.

Takeaway: Melatonin has never been the magic bullet people want it to be, but sales are booming even if it's possible to take too much. 

COMORBID WATCH 
Association of bedtime with mortality and major cardiovascular events: an analysis of 112,198 individuals from 21 countries in the PURE study
SLEEP MEDICINE
February 5, 2021

From the research study abstract: “Bedtime was recorded based on self-reported habitual time of going to bed in 112,198 participants from 21 countries in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study. Participants were prospectively followed for 9.2 years. We examined the association between bedtime and the composite outcome of all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure. Participants with a usual bedtime earlier than 10PM were categorized as ‘earlier’ sleepers and those who reported a bedtime after midnight as ‘later’ sleepers. Cox frailty models were applied with random intercepts to account for the clustering within centers.

Takeaway: Looks like later sleepers aren't the only ones who might be in trouble.

HYGIENE WATCH

Young Athletes Need their Sleep to Achieve Top Performance: Henry Ford sleep medicine specialist offers strategies on how to get a good night’s rest
HENRY FORD HEALTH SYSTEM
February 9, 2021

From the press release: “These helpful tips from Dr. Singh can guide student athletes toward building healthier sleep habits and getting the right amount of sleep.

Takeaway: High school student athletes are slowly returning to sports competition, so this advice should be top of mind as they transition back to a more demanding schedule as pandemic restrictions ease for them.

LEGAL WATCH

He said he was asleep at time of wife's murder. His health app said otherwise
MASHABLE
February 9, 2021

From the article: “West reportedly told law enforcement that he had gone to sleep around 10:30 p.m. the night of his wife's death in 2018. However, according to data from his phone's health app, he took 18 steps between 11:03 p.m. and 11:10 p.m.

Takeaway: Hmmm. Murder or parasomnia?


BIO:  AAST blog columnist Tamara Sellman RPSGT, CCSH curates the sleep health information clearinghouse, SleepyHeadCENTRAL, where she follows sleep health news headlines daily. She is also an independent sleep health journalist, writes sleep-related columns for chronic illness patient advocacy publishers, and produces the Journal Club continued education presentations for the AAST. You might occasionally see her work in A2Zzz as well. She can be reached at sleepyheadcentral@gmail.com.