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Sleep Technology

AAST Blog

The latest on all issues affecting sleep technologists, including trends, insights, tips and more.

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CPAP | cpap therapy

A New Direction for Oral Appliance and CPAP Combination Therapy

By: Chris Kelly, Cert DT, Adv Cert DP, GradCertScMed
November 10th, 2022

Oral appliances and apparatus have been in existence in one way or another since 1923 when a dental surgeon and physician named Pierre Robin found that babies with micrognathia and posteriorly placed tongue (glossoptosis) not only had difficulty with feeding, but also had issues with breathing in general.1 It was from these observations, and the previous work of Lannelongue and Menard in 1891,1 that Robin subsequently published the first case of an infant with the complete Pierre Robin Syndrome (PRS) (sequence) in 1926.2 The idea of posteriorly positioned tongues and lower jaws narrowing the pharyngeal airway in general, outside of PRS, was to be further postulated for the next 30 years and a generation of dental academics.

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cpap therapy | CCSH

What’s Your Why Not?

By: Byron Jamerson, RPSGT, RST, CCSH, FAAST
November 18th, 2021

“What’s your why?” has become a popular question we ask ourselves to identify why we do the things we do — especially if that thing is challenging! Some may answer, “I do it for my health,” or “I do it for my family.”

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Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | CPAP | cpap therapy | cpap machine

What is CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) Therapy?

By: Kevin Asp, CRT, RPSGT
June 30th, 2015

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy for Sleep Apnea What is CPAP? CPAP, the abbreviation for continuous positive airway pressure therapy, is a treatment method for patients who have sleep apnea. CPAP machines use mild air pressure to keep the airways open, and are typically used by patients who have breathing problems during sleep. More specifically, what CPAP therapy helps accomplish is making sure that your airway doesn't collapse when you breathe while asleep.

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