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Sleep Technology

AAST Blog

The latest on all issues affecting sleep technologists, including trends, insights, tips and more.

Blog Feature

OSA | snoring

Axonal Degeneration in Soft Palate Nerves May Contribute to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

By: Regina Patrick, RPSGT, RST
April 22nd, 2020

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the intermittent cessation of breathing during sleep, occurs when the upper airway tissues (e.g., tonsils, fatty tissue) repeatedly collapse into the upper airway and partially or fully block airflow. The collapsibility of the upper airway in people with OSA is believed to occur because the upper airway muscles relax excessively during sleep, which allows structures supported by the muscles to collapse into the upper airway.

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